Chemical elements
  Gold
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Extraction
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Aurous fluoride
      Aurous chloride
      Aurous bromide
      Aurous iodide
      Aurous oxide
      Aurous sulphide
      Aurous thiosulphate
      Aurous Derivatives of Nitrogen
      Aurous cyanide
      Potassium aurothiocyanate
      Ammonia and Aurous Halides
      Gold dichloride
      Gold dibromide
      Gold monoxide
      Gold monosulphide
      Gold monosulphate
      Nitride of Bivalent Gold
      Auric chloride
      Aurichloric Acid
      Auric bromide
      Auribromic Acid
      Auric iodide
      Auri-iodic Acid
      Auric iodate
      Auric hydroxide
      Auric sulphide
      Auric sulphate
      Acid auryl sulphate
      Auric selenide
      Auric selenate
      Auric telluride
      Gold and Nitrogen
      Auric nitrates
      Gold and Phosphorus
      Gold arsenides
      Auric selenide
      Auric antimonide
      Auric cyanide
      Salts of Auricyanic Acid
      Double Salts of Auric thiocyanate
      Gold carbide
      Gold and Silicon
    PDB 1a52-4acl

Gold dichloride, AuCl2






At 170° C. dry chlorine unites with dried gold-powder to form the Gold dichloride, AuCl2, a very hygroscopic, dark-red substance, decomposed by the action of moist air. The individuality of this compound has been a matter of dispute, and it has been assumed to be a molecular compound of the formula AuCl,AuCl3, containing equimolecular proportions of aurous chloride and auric chloride. Thermochemical data indicate that this assumption is incorrect.


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