Chemical elements
  Gold
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Extraction
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Aurous fluoride
      Aurous chloride
      Aurous bromide
      Aurous iodide
      Aurous oxide
      Aurous sulphide
      Aurous thiosulphate
      Aurous Derivatives of Nitrogen
      Aurous cyanide
      Potassium aurothiocyanate
      Ammonia and Aurous Halides
      Gold dichloride
      Gold dibromide
      Gold monoxide
      Gold monosulphide
      Gold monosulphate
      Nitride of Bivalent Gold
      Auric chloride
      Aurichloric Acid
      Auric bromide
      Auribromic Acid
      Auric iodide
      Auri-iodic Acid
      Auric iodate
      Auric hydroxide
      Auric sulphide
      Auric sulphate
      Acid auryl sulphate
      Auric selenide
      Auric selenate
      Auric telluride
      Gold and Nitrogen
      Auric nitrates
      Gold and Phosphorus
      Gold arsenides
      Auric selenide
      Auric antimonide
      Auric cyanide
      Salts of Auricyanic Acid
      Double Salts of Auric thiocyanate
      Gold carbide
      Gold and Silicon
    PDB 1a52-4acl

Aurous chloride, AuCl






Partial elimination of chlorine from auric chloride by means of heat yields aurous chloride, but it is difficult to prepare it free from gold and auric chloride, and there is much divergence in the temperatures cited by various experimenters, the values ranging between 120° and 300° C. The auric chloride can be washed out of it by means of ether, but it is difficult to prevent decomposition of the aurous chloride into auric chloride and gold under the influence of traces of water:

3AuCl=AuCl3+2Au.

The decomposition by water is accelerated by rise of temperature.

The chloride is a yellowish-white substance, soluble in aqueous alkali-metal chlorides with formation of complex anions, the solutions soon decomposing with precipitation of metallic gold and the formation of complex auric derivatives. The transformation is more rapid in bromide solutions. At 110° to 120° C. aurous chloride and excess of phosphorus trichloride combine to form a double compound of the formula AuCl,PCl3, colourless prisms insoluble in water.


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